Mobile Phone

Today, firms are well aware of the fact that users are now connecting and interacting across multiple devices. Most also understand the importance of trying to connect and join the dots of Customer Experience across these multiple touch points. A select few have experimented with ways in which to enrich the data they have from their user behaviour, but in most cases, these remain just this, experiments.

As consumers continue to be the driving force behind innovation the requirement to bridge the gap and connect the customer experience has never been more important. Mobile will be a key driver in orchestrating user behaviour, but importantly it is not the only touch point in, what is fast becoming, a blended ecosystem. From mobiles to wearable technology and even cars, anything connectable is set to play a huge role. So, what does the future have in store? We took information from Forrester’s latest report “The Future Of Digital Experiences – Vision: The Mobile eBusiness Playbook” and dug a little deeper.

Apps and installs can become integrated pre-emptive experiences

As users we have habitualised the process of installing firm’s apps and interacting with their websites. For example, we’re familiar with checking in online for a flight or using the airlines app and accompanying e-ticket to board and complete our experience. This is just one of many modern-day examples of digital interaction.

This familiar process is however reactive in so far as it requires knowledge and action to complete and facilitate the experience. In the future, with mobile technology as a key centre-piece, these walls can collapse, and experiences can be served to users as and when they need them. We are already seeing signs of this with Alexa voice suggestions, Google Home and Smart Fridges.

Will we be more obliged to share data for more personalised experiences?

In possibly one of the more sensitive aspects concerning future connectivity – the use, management and responsibility of data will be a key theme. Most poignantly data sharing and harbouring, for use to better serve users will become increasingly relevant, as will tools and solutions that can extract meaningful insight with which to base decisions.

At present, we (the user) have become familiar with sharing data with brands we trust, such as our location and our browsing preferences. However, in the future, it seems likely that users will share more in order to be rewarded with enriched experiences across the ecosystem. For example, you may wish to share data from your wearable health device, which monitors your body temperature, which can in-turn connect to your home thermostat to autoregulate to your optimal temperature. The intricacies and security of such data remains the blocker, nonetheless it isn’t hard to see digital experiences progressing in this regard.

Will development and the way content is served change?

As Forrester’s report details; “today, developers build standalone websites and apps with hardwired logic. While they can update content, today’s task flows are hard-coded”. Forrester believes changing habits and demands will result in development whereby “content and metadata-tagged components can hand over access to third parties that will dynamically assemble the components into streamlined task flows based on user context”. With user behaviour driving development, there will be shifts, in development concepts and traditions as well as partnerships that are required to deliver this level of content to the user.

Closing thoughts

It’s apparent that modern user behaviour is already growing faster than most businesses are currently adapting. Segmentation and personalisation is not enough, it’s merely a foot in the door for what the future holds. This latest Forrester report goes into great detail and discusses, how digital experiences will evolve, explains the transition from silo’s to connected ecosystems and details why no individual thing will replace mobile. You can download it for yourself, free, by clicking below.

Future of mobile

Paul Walter

Paul Walter